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Safety and Security

Policies and resources regarding campus safety and security. 

Ban (No-Trespass) Policy

The purpose of this policy is to establish guidelines for the University of Chicago’s issuance of a no-trespass warning to a person who is, has been or is threatening to be present on University property and who has engaged, or is reasonably likely to engage, in criminal activity, a violation of University policy, or conduct that is or may reasonably be deemed to be threatening, disruptive, or violent. A no-trespass warning, also called a ban notice, constitutes an official prohibition against entering University property. Any person who violates a no-trespass warning will be arrested and charged with criminal trespass under the Illinois Criminal Code.1

Policy

The University has substantial and meaningful ties to the surrounding communities and, indeed, the rest of the world. For this reason, even though the entire campus is private property, most outdoor areas and some buildings on campus are, in a general sense and during normal business hours, “open to the public.” At the same time, the University is committed to safeguarding the people who learn, research, live, work and visit here, to ensuring the safe operation of University activities, and to protecting University assets. The University thus can, and does, restrict access to buildings and some outdoor areas during non-business hours. Additionally, from time to time, the University exercises its right to deny access to some or all University property after a reasoned determination has been made that a person has engaged, or is reasonably likely to engage, in criminal activity, a violation of University policy, or conduct that is or may reasonably be deemed to be threatening, disruptive, or violent.

A no-trespass warning remains in effect until modified or withdrawn in writing by an authorized University official. Regardless of whether a no-trespass notice has been issued, any person who is deemed to have committed a crime may be arrested by law enforcement and referred for prosecution. For purposes of this policy, “University property” includes all indoor and outdoor spaces owned or leased by or from the University, including but not limited to all buildings that constitute the University of Chicago Medical Center.

Process

Persons who have engaged, or are reasonably likely to engage, in criminal activity, a violation of University policy, or conduct that is or may reasonably be deemed to be threatening, disruptive, or violent may be issued a no-trespass warning. The warning may be given orally or in writing at the time of the concerning conduct, or later via a written notification sent to the banned person via email, first class mail and/or certified mail. Generally, a written no-trespass notice will inform the person:

  1. That he/she is barred from all University property or parts of University property (specifying the portion, e.g., the Medical Center, solely for purposes of obtaining medical treatment);
  2. Of the duration of the ban;
  3. Of the reason for the ban; and (iv) that if he/she returns to University property (or the designated portion) he/she will be subject to arrest for criminal trespass. No-trespass warnings are effective immediately.

Designated officials within the following University administrative units are authorized to issue a no-trespass warning: UCPD, the Office of Legal Counsel, College Housing, Campus Life and Student Services, the Office of the Provost, Residential Real Estate, and Human Resources. A UCPD General Order also governs UCPD’s issuance of no-trespass warnings. If feasible, an administrative unit that wishes to issue a no-trespass warning should first consult with the Office of Legal Counsel. No-trespass warnings are circulated to University officials and others on a need-to-know basis.

Review

A person who has received a no-trespass warning may make a written petition for the review of the warning by directing the request to the Associate Provost for Faculty and Student Affairs or his or her designee. The petition must include the reasons for the review request, a complete and candid explanation for the conduct that precipitated the no-trespass warning, the basis for the desire to be on University property, and any other information the person wishes to be considered. Normally, a substantive determination on the petition will be made and communicated in writing within thirty days of receipt. The no-trespass warning remains in effect during and after the review process, unless the warning is modified or withdrawn.

1. The University also has the authority, exercised in its reasoned judgment, to ban current employees, students and visitors, using existing processes.  For example, under the University’s disciplinary systems, any student who receives a disciplinary suspension is automatically banned from University property and prohibited from using all University resources.  Likewise, the University may ban an employee on an interim basis if he or she is deemed to pose an imminent threat to University property or operations, to the safety or well being of others, or otherwise has engaged in unacceptably disruptive conduct. 

For information on other University policies, please visit the Office of Legal Counsel site. 

Emergency Medical Care

The University of Chicago Medical Center operates both an Adult Emergency Department (773-702-6250) and the Comer Children's Emergency Department (773-702-6249). Emergency telephone consultation can be obtained by calling either emergency department. If an emergency visit is necessary, a faculty member may, upon arrival, identify him or herself as such to the triage nurse. Prior approval from one's health plan for emergency care may be necessary. The entrance to the Adult Emergency Department is located on 58th Street, two blocks east of Cottage Grove Avenue and the entrance to the Comer Children's Emergency Department is located on Drexel Avenue, between 57th and 58th Streets.

Firearms, Other Lethal Weapons, Fireworks and Dangerous Objects and Materials

The University of Chicago is committed to providing a safe and secure learning, working and living environment.  Subject to the exceptions in Section III, the University prohibits the possession, use or storage of firearms, other lethal weapons, fireworks, and other dangerous objects or materials by anyone:

  1. on any property owned, leased or controlled by the University, including but not limited to all buildings, land, parking areas, sidewalks and common areas;
  2. in any vehicle, owned, leased or controlled by the University regardless of location;
  3. at any external, University-sponsored activities or events; and
  4. employed by the University when conducting University business anywhere.

Definition

Firearm means any device, regardless of its name, that is designed to expel a projectile by the action of an explosion, expansion of gas or escape of gas; any imitation or replica firearm; and any firearm that has been rendered inoperative.

Other lethal weapons consist of instruments, material or devices that ordinarily could result in or are readily capable of causing serious bodily injury or death, including replicas of the same.  These include but are not limited to ammunition, gunpowder, BB guns, pellet guns, paint guns, stun guns, flare guns, blow guns, clubs, slingshots, blackjacks, swords, sabers, daggers, machetes, hatchets, crossbows, nunchucks, throwing stars, batons, billy clubs, and knives except those used as common eating utensils and personal use knives with folding blades four inches or less.1

Fireworks include but are not limited to firecrackers, rockets, roman candles, cherry bombs, toy cannons and toy guns in which explosive materials are used, fire balloons, or other devices containing any combustible or explosive substance used to propel another object.

Other dangerous objects or materials means any object or material designed to inflict injury or death, including items that pose a potential hazard to the safety or health of others, and unauthorized hazardous materials or chemicals.

Exceptions

  1. Law Enforcement:  This policy permits the possession, use and storage of firearms and other lethal weapons by sworn law enforcement personnel, authorized security officers and armed guards possessing, using and storing such devices as required by their job.
  2. University Work:  This policy permits lawful possession, use and storage of knives, other lethal weapons, and dangerous objects or materials within the scope of a person’s employment by the University or work as a University contractor.  For example, this policy does not prohibit the authorized possession, use and storage of radioactive materials in connection with laboratory research, or knives and other lethal weapons in connection with food preparation or consumption, or saws or shearing devices by Facilities Services employees or contractors.
  3. Sponsored Programs:  This policy permits the lawful possession, use and storage of other lethal weapons in connection with regularly scheduled and University-authorized educational, recreational or training programs, where the weapon is required for or is a central part of the curriculum or activity (e.g., the use of foils in fencing classes).
  4. Ceremonies, Parades and Performances:  This policy permits the lawful possession, use and storage of imitation firearms or lethal weapons by participants in any University-sponsored ceremony, parade or theatrical performance, provided that an academic appointee or staff employee has expressly agreed to supervise their use as part of his or her regular job responsibilities and advance written approval has been obtained from the Associate Vice President/Chief of Police (or his/her designee). Note: imitation firearms and lethal weapons should only be possessed, used and stored in settings where it is unlikely that their purpose would be misunderstood; also, easily identifiable toys, such as brightly colored or clear water guns, are excepted from this policy.
  5. Parking Lots and Non-University Vehicles:  This policy permits a person carrying a validly licensed concealed firearm under Illinois law to park a non-University owned or controlled vehicle he or she is driving or in which he or she is a passenger in any University owned, leased or occupied parking area or lot, but only if the firearm and any associated ammunition are maintained, at all times, in a case within the locked vehicle or in a locked container out of plain view and within the vehicle.  A “case” includes a glove compartment or console that completely encloses the firearm and ammunition, the trunk of the vehicle, or a firearm-carrying box, shipping box, or other container.  Also, the person may carry the concealed firearm in the immediate area surrounding the vehicle within the parking lot, but only for the limited purpose of storing or retrieving it from the trunk and only if the person unloads the firearm before exiting the vehicle.  The University retains the authority to designate certain University owned, leased or occupied parking areas or lots as restricted areas in which all vehicles containing firearms are prohibited.  In those instances, the University will post signage indicating the prohibition.
  6. At Home:  Nothing in this policy prohibits a University employee who is conducting University business while at home (other than in University housing) from possessing or storing firearms, other lethal weapons, fireworks, and other dangerous objects or materials. Nothing in this policy prohibits possession of knives in University housing for common eating utensils and food preparation purposes.
  7. Special Exceptions:  In addition, the University’s Chief of Police (or his/her designee) is authorized to grant additional exceptions either in connection with extraordinary emergency situations or in response to written requests and as follows.  Written requests must be made at least 10 days in advance of the date on which possession, use or storage of the prohibited item is proposed.  Using reasoned judgment, the Chief of Police will consider each request based on the circumstances associated with the request.  The Chief of Police will issue his or her determination and any associated restrictions or conditions in writing.

Violations and Reporting

Any student or group that violates this policy will be subject to discipline under the Housing Disciplinary System and/or an Area Disciplinary System.  Contractors who violate this policy will be subject to contract termination.  Staff employees, academic appointees, visiting academics, post-doctoral researchers, employees of affiliates and volunteers who violate this policy will be subject to discipline using the disciplinary processes applicable to each category.  Employees of affiliates, volunteers, visitors or guests who violate this policy will be subject to the University’s Ban Policy.  Discipline includes removal from the Housing System, suspension, expulsion, termination of employment or appointment, revocation of volunteer status, and a ban from accessing University property.  In addition, because conduct that violates this policy may also constitute a crime, the University may refer any violation of this policy to law enforcement officials and thus persons who violate this policy may be arrested and prosecuted.

Any person with knowledge of a policy violation is expected to communicate promptly with the University of Chicago Police Department, the Office of the Vice President of Campus Life and Student Services, the Office of the Provost, or Human Resources.  Reports also may be made using the University’s whistleblower hotline (800-971-4317).

  1. Many common objects and materials may be used or modified for use as a weapon.  In deciding whether such an object or material is a weapon under this policy, the University will use reasoned judgment when considering, among other factors, the time, place and circumstances surrounding the use and possession of the common object or tool, including the explanation for its possession or use and whether it has been modified or altered to make it more effective as a weapon.

Illinois Abused and Neglected Child Reporting Act

What follows are answers to frequently asked questions that are designed to help academic appointees, students in academic jobs, and postdoctoral researchers understand the nature of their obligations to report child abuse and neglect.

  1. What is ANCRA? ANCRA is the Illinois Abused and Neglected Child Reporting Act, the Illinois child welfare law that requires certain individuals called “mandated reporters” to report suspected child abuse or neglect to the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (IDCFS).
  2. What is a “mandated reporter?" ​Under ANCRA, “mandated reporters” are persons who are legally required to report immediately the suspected abuse or neglect of a child know to them in their official capacity to the IDCFS Child Abuse Hotline at 1-800-25-ABUSE FREE. The hotline is staffed 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.
  3. Who at the University is a mandated reporter? Based on a recent change in the law, all University personnel are mandated reporters, including but not limited to all staff employees, academic appointees, postdoctoral researchers, student employees, and volunteers.
  4. What does it mean to “suspect child abuse or neglect?” The threshold for reporting is when a mandated reporter has reasonable cause to believe that abuse or neglect is occurring to a child known to him or her in his or her official capacity.
  5. What is “reasonable cause” within the meaning of ANCRA? ANCRA does not define the term, and although there is no precise, universally accepted definition, reasonable cause under ANCRA generally exists when the known facts and the rational inferences that may be drawn from those facts would cause a reasonable person to conclude that a child is being abused or neglected.
  6. What is a “child” within the meaning of ANCRA? “Child” means any person under the age of 18 years, unless legally emancipated by reason of marriage or entry into a branch of the United States armed services.
  7. What is an “abused child” within the meaning of ANCRA? An “abused child” includes but is not limited to a child whose parent or immediate family member, or any person responsible for the child's welfare, or any individual residing in the same home as the child, or a paramour of the child's parent:
    • inflicts, causes to be inflicted, or allows to be inflicted upon a child physical injury, by other than accidental means, which causes death, disfigurement, impairment of physical or emotional health, or loss or impairment of any bodily function;
    • creates a substantial risk of physical injury to a child by other than accidental means which would be likely to cause death, disfigurement, impairment of physical or emotional health, or loss or impairment of any bodily function;
    • commits or allows to be committed any sex offense against a child, as sex offense is defined in the Illinois Criminal Code and Wrongs to Children Act, and extending those definitions of sex offenses to include children under 18 years of age;
    • commits or allows to be committed an act or acts of torture upon a child; or inflicts excessive corporal punishment.
  8. What is a “neglected child” within the meaning of ANCRA? Neglect occurs when a person responsible for the child deprives or fails to provide the child with adequate food, clothing, shelter, or needed medical treatment.  Abandonment and inadequate supervision also constitute neglect. Further, neglect occurs under ANCRA when a child “is subjected to an environment which is injurious insofar as:
    • the child’s environment creates a likelihood of harm to the child’s health, physical well-being, or welfare and
    • the likely harm to the child is the result of a blatant disregard of parent or caretaker responsibilities.” According to IDCFS, “blatant disregard” means an incident where the real, significant, and imminent risk of harm would be so obvious to a reasonable parent or caretaker that it is unlikely that a reasonable parent or caretaker would have exposed the child to the danger without exercising precautionary measures to protect the child from harm.
  9. What are some examples of abuse and neglect? Although you should always use your best judgment to assess whether a child you know in your official capacity has been abused or neglected, normally you would call the IDCFS Child Abuse Hotline under circumstances such as:
    • you see marks on a child's body that do not appear to have been caused by accident;
    • you see someone hitting a child with an object;
    • a child tells you that he or she has been harmed or sexually abused by someone;
    • a child appears to be undernourished, is dressed inappropriately for the weather, or is young and has been left alone.
  10. What does it mean to know a child in my “official capacity?" Although ANCRA does not define “official capacity,” generally the term means the things you do in the course of carrying out the duties of your role at the University.  Thus to know a child in your official capacity means that you have become aware of or have gotten to know a child in the course of doing your job.  For example, a department chair who meets the children of a graduate student at a departmental social event would be deemed to know those children in his or her official capacity.  Likewise, an academic appointee who meets a child in connection with giving a lecture at the University would be deemed to know the child in his or her official capacity.
  11. What if I see or suspect child abuse off campus – for example, while taking a walk in the park, I see a man strike a child repeatedly with his fists? It depends on the circumstances.  As a mandated reporter, you are required only to report acts of suspected abuse or neglect that you learn about in your official capacity as a University employee, including but not limited to abuse or neglect you witness at a University event or on University property.  If the child you witnessed being abused during your walk in the park is not somebody you know through conducting your duties as a University academic appointee, then you do not have a duty to report to IDCFS, although you are not prohibited from doing so.  On the other hand, if you know the child because you met him or her while giving a tour of your research laboratory to a group of middle school students, you would have a duty to report immediately to IDCFS.
  12. What should I do if I have reasonable cause to believe that a child I know in my official capacity is being abused or neglected? You must immediately call the IDCFS Child Abuse Hotline at 1-800-25-ABUSE FREE.  Hotline staff are social workers with special training in determining what constitutes child abuse and neglect under ANCRA.
  13. What happens when I call the Hotline? When you call, a hotline social worker will listen to what you wish to report.  You should be prepared to tell the Hotline worker all germane facts related to the situation, including the child’s name, address and age; the nature of the suspected abuse or neglect, including when and where it occurred; the names of suspected perpetrators and their relationship to the child (parent, teacher, etc.); and any other information you think may help. The hotline worker will ask questions to help gather enough information to determine whether to take a formal report.  If there is not enough information to make a report, the worker will tell you so and answer any questions you may have.  If a formal report is taken, a child protection investigator will begin the investigation within 24 hours, but much sooner if the child is considered at immediate risk of harm.
  14. How am I protected if I report abuse or neglect? People who report alleged child abuse or neglect in good faith cannot be held liable for damages under criminal or civil law. In addition, their names are not given to the person they name as the abuser or to anyone else unless ordered by a hearing officer or judge. Although as a mandated reporter you may make a report without giving your name, doing so is disadvantageous because the investigator will not be able to contact you to verify information or gather additional information; you will not be notified of the results of the investigation; and if something happens to the child, you will have no legal proof that you fulfilled your role as a mandated reporter.
  15. Should I also call the police? If a child appears to be in imminent danger, you should seek immediate protection for the child by calling the University of Chicago Police Department at 2-8181 or the Chicago Police Department at 911.
  16. Do I satisfy my reporting duty if I tell my chair or call the police? No.  Reporting suspected abuse or neglect to a colleague, chair, dean, provost, an Harassment Complaint Adviser, the University’s whistleblower hotline or even the police department – but not IDCFS – does not satisfy the legal duty to report.  The only means of fulfilling one’s legal obligation and avoiding legal penalty is to report the suspected child abuse or neglect to IDCFS.
  17. What are the consequences if I fail to make a report to IDCFS even though I have a reasonable basis to believe that a child I know in my official capacity is being abused or neglected? Under the law, a mandated reporter's failure to report suspected instances of child abuse or neglect to IDCFS constitutes a Class A misdemeanor punishable by a term of imprisonment for up to one year, or by a fine not to exceed $1,000, or both, and a second or subsequent violation is a Class 4 felony.  Finally, if you knowingly fail to report a case of suspected child abuse or neglect to IDCFS when you have a reasonable basis for doing so, you may be disciplined up to and including termination of appointment.
  18. Do I have additional obligations as a mandated reporter? Yes, under ANCRA, all mandated reporters must complete, sign and date an IDCFS-issued document called “acknowledgment of mandated reporter status” at their time of hire.  By signing the document, the individual acknowledges his or her status as a mandated reporter and affirms that he or she understands the applicable reporting requirements.  Also, as a matter of University policy, once you make a report to IDCFS, you must promptly notify the head of your academic unit – section chief, department chair, dean or provost – that you have made a report, as well as the circumstances that compelled the report.

For more information about the Abused and Neglected Child Report Act, please visit the Illinois General Assembly site. 

 

Mandatory Reporting of Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect

Illinois law requires certain individuals – called mandated reporters – to immediately report suspected child abuse or neglect to the Illinois Department of Child and Family Services (IDCFS) Child Abuse Hotline at 1-800-25-ABUSE FREE.

Under the law, all “personnel of institutions of higher education” are mandated reporters and must immediately report any instance where there is reasonable cause to believe that a child known to them in their official capacity may be abused or neglected. This means that all University academic appointees/postdoctoral researchers, regardless of rank or compensation status, are mandated reporters. Note: some academic appointees/postdoctoral researchers also may be mandated reporters by virtue of being in another category of mandated reporters, e.g., physician.

The University thus requires all University academic appointees/postdoctoral researchers to immediately report to IDCFS if they have reasonable cause to believe a child known to them in their official capacity may be abused or neglected.

Failure by a mandated reporter to immediately report suspected instances of child abuse or neglect to IDCFS constitutes a Class A misdemeanor. Moreover, reporting suspicions to a colleague, mentor, chair, dean, director, provost, the Harassment Complaint Advisers, or the University’s whistleblower hotline – but not IDCFS – does not satisfy the legal duty to report. The only means of fulfilling one’s legal obligation and avoiding legal penalty is to report the suspected child abuse or neglect to IDCFS.

Reporting

Every University academic appointee/postdoctoral researcher who has reasonable cause to believe a child known to him/her in his/her official capacity has been abused or neglected must immediately call the IDCFS Hotline at 1-800-25-ABUSE FREE. This hotline is staffed 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Thereafter, the academic appointee/postdoctoral researcher who makes such a report must promptly notify the head of his/her academic unit – mentor, section chief, department chair, dean or provost – that a report has been made, as well as the underlying circumstances that compelled the report.

If a child is in imminent danger, the academic appointee/postdoctoral researcher should seek immediate protection for the child by calling the University of Chicago Police Department at 2-8181 or the Chicago Police Department at 911.  After making this emergency call, the postdoctoral researcher must immediately call the IDCFS Hotline.

Definitions1

Child means any person under the age of 18 years, unless legally emancipated by reason of marriage or entry into a branch of the United States armed services.

Abused child includes but is not limited to a child whose parent or immediate family member, or any person responsible for the child's welfare, or any individual residing in the same home as the child, or a paramour of the child's parent:

  • inflicts, causes to be inflicted, or allows to be inflicted upon such child physical injury, by other than accidental means, which causes death, disfigurement, impairment of physical or emotional health, or loss or impairment of any bodily function;
  • creates a substantial risk of physical injury to such child by other than accidental means which would be likely to cause death, disfigurement, impairment of physical or emotional health, or loss or impairment of any bodily function;
  • commits or allows to be committed any sex offense against such child, as sex offense is defined in the Illinois Criminal Code and Wrongs to Children Act, and extending those definitions of sex offenses to include children under 18 years of age;
  • commits or allows to be committed an act or acts of torture upon such child;
  • inflicts excessive corporal punishment.

Neglected child includes but is not limited to any child who is not receiving the proper or necessary nourishment or medically indicated treatment including food or care not provided solely on the basis of the present or anticipated mental or physical impairment as determined by a physician acting alone or in consultation with other physicians or otherwise is not receiving the proper or necessary support or medical or other remedial care recognized under State law as necessary for a child's well-being, or other care necessary for his or her well- being, including adequate food, clothing and shelter; or who is abandoned by his or her parents or other person responsible for the child's welfare without a proper plan of care.

Mandated Reporter Acknowledgment

Effective June 27, 2012, and as a condition of appointment, all new University academic appointees/postdoctoral researcher must execute the IDCFS-issued “Acknowledgment of Mandated Reporter Status” form, which will be maintained by the University as a personnel record.

Consequences of Failing To Report

A University academic appointee/postdoctoral researcher who knowingly fails to report a case of suspected child abuse or neglect to IDCFS if they have reasonable cause to believe that a child known to them in their official capacity may be abused or neglected may be disciplined up to and including termination of appointment.

Immunity

Illinois law protects the identity of all mandated reporters and gives them immunity from liability as a result of good faith reports.  However, any mandated reporter who fails to report an instance of child abuse or neglect commits a crime and may be prosecuted.  More importantly, failing to report child abuse or neglect means that a child may continue to be abused or neglected.

Other Considerations

The Illinois Rules of Professional Responsibility are applicable to academic appointees who practice law as part of their job responsibilities. Those academic appointees may disclose client confidences only as permitted or required by the Rules.

Resource Materials

All University academic appointees are strongly encouraged to review educational materials provided by IDCFS regarding mandated reporter obligations, including the on-line training module “Recognizing and Reporting Child Abuse: Training for Mandated Reporters.” Additional on-line resources include the IDCFS web page for mandated reporters, the IDCFS Manual for Mandated Reporters, and and the Abused and Neglected Child Reporting Act

In June 2012, a long-standing Illinois law was amended to expand the definition of “mandated reporters” of child abuse and neglect to include “all personnel of institutions of higher education.” Since 1975, “mandated reporters” under the law have typically been professionals (e.g., physicians and teachers) who work with children in the course of their professional duties.  Some University of Chicago employees thus have been mandated reporters under the law for their entire careers here.

This new law means that now, ALL University personnel are “mandated reporters” and must immediately report to a 24-hour hotline any instance where there is reasonable cause to believe that a child known to them in their official capacity is being abused or neglected. Additionally, every new University employee now must execute at the time of hire an “acknowledgement of mandated reporter status” form as prescribed by the state.

Your execution of the form is a condition of appointment.  If you refuse to sign the form, your appointment will not become effective. The University strongly encourages you to take IDCFS’s online training course to help you understand more about your role in recognizing and reporting child abuse. You can print a Certificate of Completion upon successful completion of the training. The training can be accessed here.

Additional online resources include:

You should feel free to contact Ted Stamatakos in the Office of Legal Counsel with any questions: 773-702-7516, stamatak@uchicago.edu.

1. Definitions are from the Illinois Abused and Neglected Child Reporting Act, 325 ILCS 5/1 et seq.

Policy on the Safety of Children in University Programs

The University of Chicago is committed to providing a safe and secure environment for children who participate in University programs. This policy affirms that commitment by setting forth screening, training and conduct requirements for faculty, academic appointees, postdoctoral researchers, staff, student employees, volunteers and others who staff University programs that serve children. This policy also restates the legal obligation borne by all University faculty, academic appointees, postdoctoral researchers, staff, student employees and volunteers to report known or suspected abuse or neglect of a child. Under this policy, a “child” or “minor” is any person under the age of 18.

To see the full text of the University's Policy on the Safety of Children in University Programs, please click here

To see FAQs about the University's Policy on the Safety of Children in University Programs, please click here

Safety and Security

The Department of Safety & Security is dedicated to promoting a safe and secure environment in which knowledge may be freely and rigorously pursued. To achieve this mission, this department calls upon its collective skills and expertise to provide an integrated safety program through collaborative partnerships, while adhering to our core values of respect, integrity, service and excellence. For more information about this department, please visit the University's Safety & Security site. 

Threat Assessment

The University of Chicago affirms its long-standing commitment to robust intellectual dialogue and disagreement, and to civil conduct on campus and in its programs.

When someone, whether a member of the University of Chicago community or not, jeopardizes that environment or threatens a person or people with violence, the University must call upon its full resources to promptly assess the situation, intervene as appropriate, and support those who raised concerns about the threat and others who may be involved. Preventing violence on campus depends on members of the University community identifying and communicating behaviors of concern. Early identification of a concern allows University officials, if appropriate, to reach out to an individual or individuals, evaluate the circumstances, provide resources, reduce his or her stress if relevant, and avoid or minimize harm to the individual and others. This process aims to promote early voicing of concerns and to be supportive, not punitive, while at the same time making campus safety paramount. For more information about this process, please visit the Voilence Prevention Policy and Threat Assessment Team page on the Common Sense site.

Whistle Blower

It is the responsibility of employees who are aware of inappropriate actions to make the University aware so the situation can be properly addressed. For details on the University's process for addressing inappropriate activites, please visit the Whistleblower page of the Risk Management and Internal Audit site.