The University makes compensated and uncompensated OAA appointments. Compensated appointments may qualify for benefits or not. What follows applies to individuals who are benefits-ineligible.

Principles:

  1. The existence of an appointment itself does not establish an employment relationship with the University.
  2. Whether the University is compensating a benefits-ineligible appointee for scheduled, compensated effort during the appointment determines whether the appointee is in an employment relationship with the University at that time.

Illustrative Examples:

Some OAAs are University employees only during part of the appointive term. That is, they may not be performing scheduled, compensated effort in all three (AWSp) or four (in BSD) quarters of the year although the appointment spans one or more “off” quarters. Individuals with these appointments are not in an employment relationship with the University during those off quarters; however, because the appointees remain affiliated with the University, they are subject to its policies (Unless they are regular, salaried benefits-eligible employees, Lecturers are unaffiliated with the University in quarters in which they have no scheduled, compensated teaching effort).

In BSD there are clinical, educational, or other functions carried out by appointees with Clinical Associate, Clinical Instructor, Clinical Assistant Professor, etc. titles. When there is no effort compensated by the University with salary, these appointees are not in an employment relationship to the University.

Because non-employee appointees remain affiliated with the University during the term of appointment, they are subject to its policies and the University has the right to end such appointments, upon written notice to the appointee, without additional process and without liability. If an appointment includes Medical Staff privileges as a condition at the time the appointment is initiated, at the time when privileges end or are suspended, the appointment will end immediately.